Secret Societies – Shortcut to Wealth & Power or Scams?

All for nothing. Is it possible? Could you get all the money in the world, the healthiest body, or the best relationships overnight? 

Believe it or not, there are still people who want to believe it. But why? Isn’t it evident that greatness takes work and effort? You have to do what others won’t do, so you can get what others can’t: minority mindset.

But what could be better than joining a secret group? After all, wealth isn’t always about what has more value, but also what’s the rarest to find. Secret societies look valuable because few people know about them.

But exclusiveness doesn’t replace true worth. In most cases, these statuses hide clever scams to make people buy useless products. 

What Is A Secret Society?

“Many would consider the day they got this letter as the luckiest one in their lives. We share secrets on how to make billions, lose weight overnight, attract the opposite sex, or find your purpose in life, all by doing nothing. We grant you a life of unbelievable success and happiness.”

Secret society scammers promise you everything you ever wanted to achieve, for a fee. They play with people’s expectations, so they believe the promises and pay the registration. 

When you join, however, what you find is not different from a mystical make-money book series. Except that you paid ten times as much, discount included.

Now, who are the people who belong to this society? You read testimonials before joining, but once you’re in, you don’t hear of any members other than you. You’re alone in a suspicious program with dubious chances to get your refund.

Secret societies are the only scams where lack of information looks valuable instead of suspicious. Then what’s the truth? 

A mere Internet scammer has compiled common-sense knowledge about success and sold it to you for an inflated price. Before you turn it down, know that the group does teach you one secret. The secret to fooling innocent people with misleading marketing tactics.

Why Would You Want To Join A Secret Society?

Secret societies do exist, except that they don’t email random strangers asking for a fee. Real societies would fear that you share their secret with others, so they’re no longer private.

This secretness changes people’s perception and expectations. The question is: What are they really buying, and why?

  • Secret Status: If being successful feels awesome, joining a secret group feels even better. Not only you’re going to live in abundance, but you know 99% of people outside the group will never enjoy your “privileges”: a greedy mentality.
  • Credibility: People would work with ordinary businesses without social proof and reliable history. Somehow, secret societies suggest the opposite: a group has no proof because it’s secret, which also means others can’t detect the scam.
  • All-for-nothing: Everybody wants success, happiness, and fulfillment. It’s very hard to believe that all these secrets concentrate on one lucky group when the whole world is looking for them. It certainly won’t happen without effort.

Secret scams are reserved for those who want to believe a world of promises. For a person who looks real success, it screams “scam.”

Secret Society or Secret Email List? 4 Warning Signs

Secret groups rely on confidence tricks heavily. People will rarely pay for something they can’t prove. But if you can convince them to buy— and they want to believe it’s real— victims will convince themselves that it was worth it. Even after they discover the con.

You should, of course, approach these groups with an open mind in case they’re legit. Check for these warning signs:

#1 Pay To Join

A mere $99 payment won’t make you a king. Only qualified people join secret groups. If all you did to join was using a credit card, then that’s all that makes you different.

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We invite you to think further: these secret members promise to help you reach unattainable wealth. If they practice what they preach, they must have a multi-billionaire lifestyle already. Why would they want to charge you $99, $200, or $300 bucks?

Thus, money can’t be the reason you qualify. If it is, you may as well assume there are no secrets, or they don’t work. They say it’s free on the letter, then sell you the $150 book on the delivered manual.

Advance Fee Fraud – What Everyone Should Know

#2 The Most Famous (and anonymous) Names

When they talk about big names belonging to the group, you think of world-class CEOs, actors, athletes, bankers, singers, maybe politicians. You might want to research whether these big names ever declared belonging to such a group, but you find nothing.

Here’s the contradiction: how can the most famous people in the world remain anonymous? Even if you joined the group, you’d still don’t know who they are!

#3 Secret Society… Without Society

Did you join the group expecting some masters to teach you? Well, they’re so secret you won’t even know their faces. You don’t know who sold you the program, who they are, or how many they are. 

With such a description, it could perfectly be a money-laundering scheme. Their society looks more like a book discussion group. The leader tells you to buy their $100 books, whether you need them or not.

These societies sometimes use social media groups. Now, we can’t guarantee the content they share is real. Perhaps, all those accounts are bots programmed to post content and reply to comments.

#4 Too Mystical

Knowing how much it will cost you, they’d better send you a good book. Unfortunately, you won’t find any secrets you haven’t heard already. If you do, they may be so complex that there’s no way to put them in action consistently.

The tone of their letter suggests that, for them, success is all about secrets and luck, even magic. 

This scenario may remind you of magicians. What they do looks amazing from the outside, so you ask them for the secret. What do they say? “Magicians never reveal their secrets.” Otherwise, it would stop being magical. Secret groups work the same way.

Secret Society Variations

The idea of one group keeping the world’s secrets isn’t new. So far, we’ve seen how book publishing con man profits from lies, but there are two other groups who do the same.

A. Book Publishing

As a publisher, you can create an attractive offer so that more people buy it. If you can’t offer what you promise, you shouldn’t advertise it. By selling common sense knowledge, secret publishers exploit a grey area in marketing.

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Sure, you can create abundance with these secrets. But you can’t find a single person who executed all of them correctly all the time. Common sense is not common practice!

B. Prime Bank Groups

You get an email one day saying you’ve joined a Prime Bank. According to the letter, only world-class investors and super-rich families can join their group, which guarantees returns over 20% per day. As you can imagine, joining them must be harder than winning the lottery. Lucky you!

Definite Guide To Securities Fraud

Unfortunately, they don’t exist. The market doesn’t give any preference to a person with status: the only rule is supply and demand. Then, how do prime banks work?

You may pay an entry fee to register. Then, you invest money on your prime bank account and watch it grow exponentially overnight! 

What you see on the screen is one thing, though. Getting that money out is a different story.

C. Pyramid Schemes

Affiliate scams aren’t secret societies, but the least people know about it, the more money you make. 

You pay the scammer, and the only way to get paid is to scam someone else. The more you scam, the more money you make!

The catch is, only early birds profit from pyramids, and these schemes always collapse, usually within a few months. You rarely hear about it on its early stage: only after millions have joined after you. And new members always lose money.

Ironically, the first members make more money when the group becomes less secret (you don’t get paid without promoting).

Definitive Guide To Affiliate Marketing Fraud – The Dark Pages

How To Stay Safe

The next time you receive an exclusive letter, read it the right way before setting expectations:

#1 Be Specific, Not Abstract

Anybody can promise you the Moon. By the time you finish reading the letter, you should know who they are, what they do, and why it works. If you can’t get to a clear conclusion, don’t do it. Fraudsters profit from confusion and confidence tricks

What would a legit group do? They’d share premium information for free, so you can make money. Once you’re successful because of them, you won’t mind paying them books to see what else you can learn from them.

#2 Logic Before Emotion

The world isn’t what you wish it to be, but what it actually is. 

Secret society letters often address meaningful goals with emotions. But extreme optimism without realism makes you aspire for a world that doesn’t exist. The society con men will only keep supporting you with this utopia as long as you pay.

Here are some logical questions to consider?

  • What results can I expect in the following time frame?
  • What’s the worst-case scenario? Can I deal with it?
  • Is there any other cost or trade-off after the purchase?

These Devious Get-Rich-Quick Scams Will Keep You Broke

Give yourself 24h-48h before deciding, no matter the certainty. You may think very differently without the pressure of time.

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